June 29 – Retrieving the Extinguished: Poems from an Assimilated Jewish American Connecting to her Jewish German Past

June 29 – Retrieving the Extinguished: Poems from an Assimilated Jewish American Connecting to her Jewish German Past

Renée Ruderman (Metropolitan State University of Denver)

June 29, 2017, 6 p.m., Fakultätssaal (Philosophicum)

This reading will feature poems from my new collection, “Where She Was Going” as well as poems from my earlier books. These poems are based on sketches and fragments, found in photographs, art, and faint memories.
Renée Ruderman, an Associate Professor of English at Metropolitan State University of Denver, Colorado, has two published books, Poems from the Rooms Below (Permanence Press, San Diego, CA, 1995) and Certain Losses, a chapbook (Main Street Rag, Charlotte, NC, 2004). She has won prizes for her poems, and some of them have appeared in The Bellingham Review, I-70 Review, Borderlands, and the Raleigh Review. Renée taught at Universität Siegen, Germany during a sabbatical in 2009, and she taught a poetry workshop at Palacky University (2013) in the Czech Republic.
June 26 – The Plantation Machine: Atlantic Capitalism in French Saint Domingue and British Jamaica, 1748-1788

June 26 – The Plantation Machine: Atlantic Capitalism in French Saint Domingue and British Jamaica, 1748-1788

Trevor Burnard (The University of Melbourne, Australia)

June 26, 2017, 6 p.m., Fakultätssaal (Philosophicum)

Jamaica and Saint Domingue were two wildly successful but socially monstrous slave societies. In the years between 1748 and 1788 these societies—based upon a plantation complex in which African labourers were brought to the Caribbean to produce luxury commodities originally developed in Asia for a European market—reached an apogee of sorts in the Greater Antilles. Jamaica and Saint Domingue came close to perfecting a form of economic organisation that operated on a global scale that provided the owners of capital (human and otherwise) with vast amounts of money and considerable geopolitical clout. These were regions that exempli ed the complex forces of early modern imperialism, forces that helped make colonialism a truly global phenomenon.

This talk explores these two socities at the height of their powers. It looks at how their plantation systems developed and at the social and cultural forms that the plantation complex in its most developed and modern form spawned. In particular, it looks at how these societies created new forms of belonging based on race and on shared values in their elites of “whiteness.” White colonial residents of Jamaica and Saint Domingue established individualistic behaviours that might be considered egalitarian if these societies had not been so dependent upon enslaved labourers for their wealth.

Trevor Burnard is Head of School and Professor of History at the School of Historical & Philosophical Studies (SHAPS) at The University of Melbourne, Australia.

June 26 – Planters and Slaves in the Greater Antilles

June 26 – Planters and Slaves in the Greater Antilles

Trevor Burnard (The University of Melbourne, Australia)

June 26, 2017, 2-4 p.m., P 13 (Philosophicum)

Professor Burnard will talk about slavery and abolition in general terms (examining the key words of interest) and then look at two case studies—the rst being why plantations in the West Indies were so slow in developing and what were their characteristics once developed, and then a case study of women in nineteenth century Berbice (now Guyana) and how they coped with slavery.

Trevor Burnard is Head of School and Professor of History at the School of Historical & Philosophical Studies (SHAPS) at The University of Melbourne, Australia.

June 16 – Life Support: Race, Technology and the Gendered Biocapital of Outsourced Labor

June 16 – Life Support: Race, Technology and the Gendered Biocapital of Outsourced Labor

Kalindi Vora (University of California, San Diego)

June 16, 2017, 10 a.m.-12 noon, Fakultätssaal (Philosophicum)

This talk thinks through how biological bodies have become a new kind of global biocapital, extending historical legacies of colonial labor practices. It examines how forms of technologized labor serve to support life in the United States at the expense of the lives of people in India. Focusing on several case studies of outsourced work, it exposes the ways in which seemingly inalienable aspects of human life such as care, love, and trust—as well as biological bodies and organs—are not only commodi able entities but also components essential to contemporary capitalism. It asks, How do forms of transnational gendered reproductive labors of care, nurture, and even biological reproductivity (such as in transnational surrogacy and reproductive services) provide an opportunity to look at historical legacies of gender and labor that have been theorized through the lens of US Ethnic Studies, while calling for a new and relational understanding of the political potential in how subjects disrupt their geographies and the roles assigned to them through their labor?

 

Kalindi Vora is Associate Professor of Ethnic Studies and a liate faculty of the Science Studies and Critical Gender Studies Programs at UC San Diego.