June 29 – Krautrock and Transnationalism

June 29 – Krautrock and Transnationalism

Ulrich Adelt (University of Wyoming)

June 29, 2017, 6 p.m.,  P 106

This talk will engage discourses of popular music and transnationalism to discuss Krautrock, West German electronic music and rock from the 1970s. Groups such as Can, Neu!, Faust and Kraftwerk blended Influences of African American and Anglo-American music with the experimental and electronic music of European composers. The talk situates the music within its particular context of (trans)national identity and globalization. Krautrock and its offshoots have had a tremendous impact on musical production and reception in Britain and the U.S. since the 1970s. Genres such as indie, post-rock, techno and hip hop have drawn heavily on krautrock and have – ironically – connected a music that initially disavowed its European American and African American origins with the lived experience of whites and blacks in the U.S. and Europe. At the same time, while reaching for an imagined cosmic community, Krautrock, not only by its name, remains tied to essentialist notions of national identity and citizenship.
Ulrich Adelt is Associate Professor for American Studies at the University of Wyoming. His publications include Krautrock: German Music in the Seventies (University of Michigan Press 2016) and Blues Music in the Sixties: A Story in Black and White (Rutgers University Press 2010).

 

June 27 – Collapse or Triumph? A Sixty-Year Assessment of the Modern American Conservative Movement.

June 27 – Collapse or Triumph? A Sixty-Year Assessment of the Modern American Conservative Movement.

Elizabeth Tandy Shermer (Loyola University)

June 27, 2017, 4 p.m., SB II 01-531

What is the state of US conservatism? Arguably, the conservative movement has been one of the most powerful and successful uprisings in twentieth-century American history and perhaps the whole of US history. However, reassessing its sixty year trajectory raises serious questions about how powerful and unified it was but also suggests this supposed juggernaut may also be so fractured that both the movement and the Republican Party cannot govern now or in the foreseeable future.

Elizabeth Tandy Shermer is an assistant professor of history at Loyola University Chicago. She has written extensively on US politics and economics for academic and popular audiences. She is currently finishing a new book on the history of the student loan industry titled Indentured Students.

When Washington Came to Lynchburg: Inside the New Religious Right, 1975-1985

When Washington Came to Lynchburg: Inside the New Religious Right, 1975-1985

Bill Bell (Cardiff University)

May 23, 2017, 4-6 p.m., SB II, 01-531

As a teenager Bill Bell had a strange tendency to be in the wrong place at the right time, for a decade finding himself in some of the key American religious conservative communities. In late 70s California, he was one of the Jesus People, attended camps of the ultra-right wing John Birch Society, and in the 80s became a founder member of the Moral Majority, graduating from the college run by the Reverend Jerry Falwell, the leading TV preacher of the day. Part-memoir, part-cultural history, this lecture will discuss the rise of the New Religious Right in the United States between 1975 and 1985, and address its significance to the ongoing dispute about the separation of Church and State. Part-memoir, part-cultural history, this lecture will discuss the rise of the New Religious Right in the United States between 1975 and 1985, and address its significance to the ongoing dispute about the separation of Church and State.

 

Bill Bell is Professor of Bibliography at Cardiff and a Visiting Fellow
of the University of Göttingen

From Abolition to Black Lives Matter: Past and Present Forms of Transnational Black Resistance

October 26-28, 2017, Johannes Gutenberg-University, Mainz, Germany.

Conference Organizers: Nele Sawallisch, Johanna Seibert, Pia Wiegmink, Frank Obenland

This conference hosted by the Transnational American Studies Institute aims at assessing and theorizing past and present forms of black intellectual, political, and cultural resistance from the era of abolitionist campaigns against the transatlantic slave trade to the recent global protest formation of Black Lives Matter.

Protests against racial discrimination, inequality, poverty, and injustice not only pervade (North) American history but span the globe and cross – oftentimes multiple – borders. Building on the recent transnational turn in American Studies and de-centering American Studies’ focus on the nation as the prime focus of analysis, this workshop invites papers that trace the Atlantic routes/roots (Gilroy), the diasporic and global trajectories, as well as the movement, circulation, and dissemination of past and present forms and ideas of black resistance. The conference aims at discussing the transnational dimension of various forms of resistance that are often embedded in larger social movements such as the anti-slavery, the anti-lynching, the Civil Rights, Black Power, Anti-Apartheid, the Global Justice, the Prison Abolition, or the Black Lives Matter movements. Investigating the transatlantic significance of these movements, this conference will also address how collective or individual acts of resistance are articulated and represented in print, performance, visual art, or other media.

This conference will address questions such as:

  • How do we conceptualize the connections between past and present forms of transnational black resistance? How does this relationship between the past and the present shape existing notions of resistance?
  • How did national movements for black equality and justice impact as well as intersect with national and international forms of protest?
  • How do forms of black resistance initiate ways to re-think forms of protest and activism outside the United States?
  • What role have different media played in and for black resistance movements throughout the centuries not only in national but also international contexts? How have the digital world and global social media changed previous forms of transnational black resistance?
  • What could be possible trajectories of movements such as Black Lives Matter in the face of the 2016 Presidential election in the United States?
  • How do protest movements intersect with scholarly and intellectual pursuits in academia? How can scholars and activists collaborate in articulating critical interventions in ongoing political discussions?

Confirmed keynote speakers:

  • Vincent Carretta (Center for Literary and Comparative Studies, University of Maryland, USA): Strangers in Strange Lands: Letter Writers in the Early Black Atlantic
  • Afua Cooper (James Robinson Johnston Chair in Black Canadian Studies, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada): Title tba
  • Charmaine Nelson (Professor of Art History, McGill University, Montreal, Canada): Title tba
  • Dorothy Randall Tsuruta (Chair of Africana Studies at San Francisco State University, USA): Title tba

Downloads/Links:

Note: There is no registration fee, if you want to participate in the conference, please register with Nele Sawallisch: sawallis@uni-mainz.de

In cooperation with:

Guest Lecture by Michael Collins on 4 May 2017: “Culture, Anarchy and the Modern City in John Dos Passos’ Manhattan Transfer”

Guest Lecture by Michael Collins on 4 May 2017: “Culture, Anarchy and the Modern City in John Dos Passos’ Manhattan Transfer”

Dr. Michael Collins (University of Kent)

“Culture, Anarchy and the Modern City in John Dos Passos’ Manhattan Transfer”

In this talk Dr. Collins considers the relationship between cultural traditions that were hostile to city life in the American experience and Dos Passos’ aesthetics of modern urban crowd in Manhattan Transfer. Additionally, he reads Dos Passos through traditions of geometric abstraction, film and left wing politics that helped shape his rewriting of dominant trends in American literary and artistic culture in the 1920s.

SB II, 04-432, Colonel Kleinmann-Weg 2

Thursday, 4th May 2017, 10 c.t. a.m.

(Dr. Collins is visiting Mainz as part of the Erasmus+ Programme and Inter-institutional Agreement)