4th of July Celebration at the Obama Institute

4th of July Celebration at the Obama Institute

As Americans celebrated the 4th of July, so too did the Obama Institute.

Festivities began at noon with a lecture by Dr. David Sirakov, Director of the Atlantic Academy.

Faculty and students were at hand in the afternoon to answer questions about posters showcasing the varied research projects of the institute.

In the evening, Prof. Philipp Gassert, President of the German Association of American Studies and Professor of Contemporary History at the University of Mannheim gave his lecture “A Time for Optimism: Doing American Studies in an Era of Global Transformations.”

Afterward, a reception provided ample opportunity to continue discussions over a glass of wine.

July 11 – The Varieties of American Patriotism: Domestic Conflict over U.S. Foreign Policy from Munich to Korea 🗓

July 11 – The Varieties of American Patriotism: Domestic Conflict over U.S. Foreign Policy from Munich to Korea 🗓

Michaela Hoenicke Moore (University of Iowa)

 

The Varieties of American Patriotism: Domestic Conflict over U.S. Foreign Policy from Munich to Korea

July 11, 2017, 4-6 p.m.,  SB II 01-531

According to conventional understanding World War Two brought about an internationalist consensus at home yielding widespread domestic support for the country’s subsequent global, military role. A closer examination of how Americans responded to the dramatic events at mid-century, however, reveals a more complex picture. Ordinary citizens vigorously participated not only in the great debate preceding Pearl Harbor but also weighed in on public controversies of the early Cold War. These views at the grassroots level reveal a continuous practice of patriotic dissent and a deep reservoir of alternative visions for America’s role in the world.

Michaela Hoenicke Moore is Associate Professor of History at the University of Iowa. She has published three books, including a study on how Americans understood the Third Reich, entitled Know Your Enemy: The American Debate on Nazism, 1933-45 (Cambridge University Press, 2010) which won a national award for the best book in diplomatic history written by a woman. She is currently working on a project exploring “The Varieties of American Patriotism” and US foreign policy debates since the 1930s.

July 11 – Surveying American Late Modernism: Partisan Review and the Cultural Politics of the Questionnaire 🗓

July 11 – Surveying American Late Modernism: Partisan Review and the Cultural Politics of the Questionnaire 🗓

Ian Afflerbach (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta)

July 11, 2017, 2-4 p.m.,  P 208

In 1939, Philip Rahv and William Phillips, editors of Partisan Review, attempted to map “The Situation in American Writing” by sending a questionnaire to some of the nation’s most accomplished authors and critics: from Wallace Stevens, Gertrude Stein, and John Dos Passos, to Lionel Trilling, Allen Tate, and R. P. Blackmur. By unpacking the eclectic archive of published (and unpublished) responses to this survey, my essay shows how the Partisan Review’s 1939 questionnaire illustrates the de ning concerns of an American late modernism emerging in the United States during the interwar period. I begin by relating how the questionnaire rose to prominence alongside modernism, through developments in mass print culture. I show how Partisan Review’s questionnaire performs a mode of cultural politics that I call “democratic dissensus,” a process of ironic negation, dispute, and re ection that was central to the magazine’s cultural project from the 1930s through the 1950s. Drawing upon periodical studies, material culture studies, and the emerging eld of late modernist studies, I position the democratic dispute engineered by Partisan Review as a signal moment not only in the magazine’s history, but in periodizing narratives about American modernism.

 

Ian Afflerbach will begin as Assistant Professor of American Literature at the University of North Georgia in Fall 2017.

 

America First and the 4th of July 🗓

The Obama Institute for Transnational American Studies invites you to an original Fourth of July celebration in the spirit of Independence and the legacy of President Barack Obama. Two eminent speakers, Dr. David Sirakov, Director of the Atlantic Academy, and Prof. Philipp Gassert, President of the German Association of American Studies, will focus in their keynotes on transnational aspects of populism and global transformations, including an American note of optimism. Sandwiched in between these lectures are poster presentations by students and faculty of the Obama Institute. Their research projects amply document the multi-ethnic constitution of the United States and the transnational orientation of the American society, paradigmatically embodied in the Obama family. A reception will round off this celebration with toasts to America’s First ideas.

Invitation & Program (PDF)

June 29 – Retrieving the Extinguished: Poems from an Assimilated Jewish American Connecting to her Jewish German Past 🗓

June 29 – Retrieving the Extinguished: Poems from an Assimilated Jewish American Connecting to her Jewish German Past 🗓

Renée Ruderman (Metropolitan State University of Denver)

June 29, 2017, 6 p.m., Fakultätssaal (Philosophicum)

This reading will feature poems from my new collection, “Where She Was Going” as well as poems from my earlier books. These poems are based on sketches and fragments, found in photographs, art, and faint memories.
Renée Ruderman, an Associate Professor of English at Metropolitan State University of Denver, Colorado, has two published books, Poems from the Rooms Below (Permanence Press, San Diego, CA, 1995) and Certain Losses, a chapbook (Main Street Rag, Charlotte, NC, 2004). She has won prizes for her poems, and some of them have appeared in The Bellingham Review, I-70 Review, Borderlands, and the Raleigh Review. Renée taught at Universität Siegen, Germany during a sabbatical in 2009, and she taught a poetry workshop at Palacky University (2013) in the Czech Republic.